Untitled Document
Black Elk Neihardt Park
Four smaller mosaics on pedestals with Prof. Thomsen's interpretations of Black Elk's descriptions of the four quarters of the world stand – in north, east, south, and west positions -- along a concrete path in the shape of a hoop representing Black Elk's “hoop of the world”; a cottonwood tree (cottonwoods were considered sacred by the Lakota) grows near the center of this hoop.
Mosaic Pedestal
WEST . . .
where the thunder beings live. The colors are blue and black. The thunder beings have the power to send rain or lightning, the power to bring life or to destroy. The symbols are life-giving rain and the bow and arrow.
Mosaic Pedestal
NORTH . . .
where the Great White Giant lives in power and the source of the cold and mighty winds which give strength and endurance. The color of the north is the white of the wild goose wing and the cleansing snows. The sacred herb of healing has one stem bearing four blossoms in the colors that represent the four quarters of the world.
Mosaic Pedestal
EAST . . .
the source of the light of day and where the morning star lives. From the light of the east come wisdom and understanding, and from understanding, peace. The symbols for the east are the morning star and the pipe, and the color for this quarter is red.
Mosaic Pedestal
SOUTH . . .
the source of summer and the power to grow. The color is yellow. The symbol is the sacred red flowering stick, which represents the tree in bloom.
Black Elk Neihardt Park - Blair, Nebraska
Black Elk Neihardt Park  
Maps
Untitled Document